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of the plan will take money from the depositors. cyprus has an economy the size of vermont but the assets eight times more than the country's gdp. therein the financial woes come as no surprise to analysts. listen to what alan greenspan said friday. >> europe has been hanging over the american markets for quite a while. the removal of that risk, i think temporarily, i think it is only temporary, has enabled the underlying forces of the market to begin to come into vision. >> and today, the clearer vision that greenspan referred to was clouded the cyprus, we have the report by cyprus matters. >> reporter: cyprus is a smaller island with a smaller economy. but now they're watching what happens in the tiny mediterranean nation. >> it's a tiny nation. the reason we care about it is of course cyprus like it was in greece. it's what it means for the bigger nations if they follow and go down the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the bigge
schoumacher. the federal reserve board is responsible for deciding how much money the economy needs to grow. in the early 1970s, the fed held to a policy of using the money supply to try to keep the economy on course. in times of inflation, the fed tightened the money supply to squeeze excess dollars out of the economy. in times of recession, it increased the money supply to stimulate growth. but in 1975, the fed, under the chairmanship of arthur burns, faced a new and troubling dilemma -- caught between persistent inflation and a growing recession, how did chairman burns keep the economy on course? by late 1974, inflation had become a serious economic problem. under pressure from rising fuel prices, inflation rose to a staggering 12%. inflated interest rates had driven up the price of mortgages and brought the building industry to a standstill. sales of new cars and home appliances plunged. in september, president gerald ford asked congress to join him in a battle against inflation. my first priority is to work with you to bring inflation under control. inflation is domestic enemy number o
the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the russians. >> they don't want to bail out the depositors because they are mainly russians. that's what the issue is. >> so finance makers said depositors are going be compensated. but with the stock market down some 60 percent those chairs are essentially wortless. >> the blanks are closed and won't open until votes on the bailout measure. people are waiting in lines at atms to withdraw money from their accounts and countries are worried around the world that citizens would take money out of their banks that's why even the most seasoned wall street veterans watching what happens in the tiny island in the mediterranean. for "nightly business report" i'm sue herrera. >> so what does it mean to american investors? we turn to the ceo of pimco the world's largest bond fund. i asked if the situation in cypress is unique or is it a serious issue for the u.s.? >> it is mai
-founder of the political economy research institute at umass, a very important research institute backed does excellent academic scholarship with a public purpose. bob's books include a number of looks, contours of descent on the u.s. economy and in 2003, two books on the living wage, 1998 book of the living wage, building a fair economy and a reasonably measure of fairness, the economics of the living wage and his most recent book is the topic for tonight, "back to full employment." i just want to add that bob's work on the living wage has been very very important. he has been probably the leading researcher on this important issue. has written numerous papers and reports in addition to his books and has traveled to cities across the country to speak about the living wage and has testified before many city councils who were considering a living wage proposal and i think this is a really important contribution and i just want to acknowledged that. bob's recent work is focused on the green economy and the achievement of the twin goals of sustainable energy and full employment. there are numbers of repor
back to uncertainty. we want the economy to get better. we will like it to be better soon, as fast as it can happen. when that happens, then this competition for our best and brightest talent will go up. in that environment, i am concerned that as they are weighing -- not the personal threats to themselves which they are willing to take -- but when they are weighing the financial certainty for their families that they will come down on a different side than government service. that is an important question. we have an all volunteer military. it has been stressed. this is another stressor. we need to be mindful of this because we are competing for the best talent. we have been getting it. there are magnificent people that raise their right hand, civilian, uniform, or whether they serve as contractors. it does not matter. they are all working hard to do the right things. it is preserving that. there is an impact here with what is going on. it is coming to our level. they are telling us there is an impact on them, and we need to be mindful of it. >> general alexander, could you comm
economy, and bring down energy costs. the budget also promotes economic growth, job creation, supports research and development in the energy sector, and moves america to a more energy independent state. it expands oil and gas development, which could generate a half a million new jobs and $14.40 trillion in increased economic activity. by preventing or delaying domestic energy exploration, the obama administration has driven jobs overseas. in this budget, the house republicans in the subsidies, -- support for this budget translates into a response will plan to grow our economy and create jobs. i yield back my time. >> i would like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from indiana. >> thank you. what we are doing here today, people in america are hurting. too many parents have come home and tell their children they do not have a job. washington has refused to make the tough choices necessary to jump-start a healthy economy to create jobs and opportunity for every american. we hear a lot from the other side of the aisle about a balanced approach. there is not much balanced about a budg
blockbuster retail sales. this economy is stronger than you think. that may be a triumph. president obama says there's no immediate debt crisis. he thinks we're clear for the next ten years. sir, are you sure? we'll have the details four on that debate and doesn't forget free market capitalism is always the best path to ross peter. later in the show we'll show you a violation of it that blows my mind. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real business. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little bett
the markets are in a bubble right now, and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. but there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or over shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing that we have a resilient economy that is growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february, rising 1.1%, the best numbers since september. analysts were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and
. treasury secretary said he doesn't think the markets are in a bubble right now and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing we have a resilient economy growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february rising 1.1%, the best number since september. analysts were worried about the impact of gasoline prices and increase in the payroll tax for us but consumers still spending money. important that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. if you're looking for something new to buy samsung will be happy to oblige vowing galaxy 4, 5 inch screen, larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch but hover your fingers over. it's the main competition. >>> with markets setting new records every day and federal reserve meeting next week, what could happen next and what should you do with your money. randy kroszner, the
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
mostly on the british economy. specifically on budget reform, childcare benefit, and performs to the national health service this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. businessorning, i had with ministerial colleagues and others and i shall have further such meetings later today. time minister the believes there is an alternative to his double debt and his loss of a aaa credit rating. is he aware that some in his cabinet believe there is an alternative for him? >> what this government is delivering is a million private sector jobs, the fastest rate of job creation in this country's history and banged on the debt by 25%. we have cut immigration by a third. we have a long road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. i'm sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of christina at ken's who was murdered on a path to school in my constituency last thursday morning. the government is right to introduce minimum custodial substances for people convicted of threatening some
money into the economy? they let us know the exit plan for all of this. melissa: taxpayer outrage, bankrupt city in california paying out a million dollars in pay raises. they are bankrupt. lori: and paying races? crazy town. fedex says more customers are taking a less expensive option and it is hitting the bottom line. melissa: the cyber threat hit by online hackers putting financial firms here on high alert. but first, time for stocks now. nicole petallides is standing by. stocks posted solid gains ahead of the fed decision. nicole: that is right. everybody focused on the fed about an hour away from now. very accommodated if fed, and we're watching a market hitting new all-time highs in the dow jones industrial. of almost 56 points at the moment showing you some names that hit some highs today including nativ united technolo. hitting the highest levels we've ever seen for those names and we cannot leave out verizon. the highest levels we'v we haven in over 11 years. so while the shareholders have been enjoying great dividends, they can now also note multi-year highs as well. as
, tyler, all about the federal reserve and the economy. >> and cyprus in there for good measure. it was a very busy news day. we're here to tell you all about it. the federal reserve did it again. says it's going to keep ierest rates where they are, near 0%. and it also says it's going to keep up its bond-buying program. the markets like what they heard from the fed along with a pledge from the new head of japan central bank about its own bold, easing measures to be unvailed on thursday. as a result, stocks moved higher here about. the dow touching an all-time intraday high. the blue chips did close 56 higher. nasdaq up by 25 and the s&p 500 se f the rst time in four sessions adding 10 points and taking us to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, suggested t
national debt is bigger than our entire economy. unless we change course, we will add another 9 trillion over the next ten years to our national debt. that debt will weigh down our country and our economy like an anchor. at some point, lenders will lose confidence in us. they will demand higher interest rates. and when they do, interest rates across the country will skyrocket on credit cards, mortgages, car loans, families. as interest rates rise, debt payments will overwhelm all other items in the budget and the debt will overwhelm the economy. our finances will collapse, the safety net will unravel and the most vulnerable that is who suffers the most under a debt crisis. a debt crisis would be the most predictable disaster in our history i look back at 2008 like it was jerds sometimes and i remember seeing all the all that was happening and i remember the panic meetings with the treasury secretary and looking back we can see what happened but at the moment it was a crisis that hit us like surprise and look what happened at the meantime look at the trillions of dollars of wealth loss, l
on the pulse of the economy and consumers. landry's is one of the country's largest estaurant and gammably companies. he is here to tell us where he sees the biggest headwinds and opportunities right now. >>> call it the anti-student loan. investors will pay school costs for a piece of student's future income. isn't that interesting? can this help solve the student debt crisis? the ceo behind it will explain this break through because even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first today's market moment. the bulls are back in the driver's seat. the fed says its policy to stimulate the economy will continue and investors breathed a sigh of relief. dow came close to setting a new record high. the nasdaq marched back toward a 12-year high. the s&p 500 finished less than seven points away from its all-time high. here is who made the big money, proctor & gamble, chevron, travelers and johnson & johnson and united technologies all closed at all-time highs. congratulationses if you own those stocks. >>> all right. our top story tonight how the government in cyprus is make b
security at this time is not the deficit. it is the economy. it is the lack of jobs. it is a future where the u.s. cannot compete with its global peers. this will bring us closer to that scenario. chairman ryan and i share wisconsin. this is a blue-collar county where people are proud of the work they do and they want to be working. but they are struggling. four years ago, 2000 employees lost their jobs. a company announced they were shutting down. we do not help them or america when we keep tax incentives for companies to ship jobs overseas instead of incentivizing companies to hire in wisconsin and in america. we do not help them when we cut programs and raise taxes on the middle class so we can lower the tax rates for the top earners in this country. that seems to be what we received in the budget that is on our guest today. budget should reflect values. what we need to do is focus on economic growth and how to get the people of america back to work. we need a real path to prosperity. when we invest in infrastructure, research, development, small business loans, we can increase competi
of the gridlock and dysfunction here in washington, d.c. they can see that our economy is slowly getting back on its feet, businesses are beginning to hire more workers, but my constituents and people across the country are very frustrated that the constant political crises are holding our recovery back right when we need to be doing everything possible to support it. after two years of debate about fiscal and economic policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisa
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
of a balanced approach that protects the american economy, the ryan republican budget guts education, medical research, infrastructure and even public safety. the ryan republican budget would actually jeopardize the economic recovery. it wouldn't help it. and in case you're thinking it -- huge and painful cuts can buy an awful lot of deficit reduction, think again. instead congressman ryan's cuts will buy more tax breaks for the wealthiest among us. this budget isn't a serious attempt to reduce the deficit. meaningful deficit reduction will require shared sacrifice, including contributions from those who can best afford to contribute. today budget committee chairman patty murray will introduce a budget that reflects the principle of balance. senator murray's plan, the democratic plan, will cut wasteful spending, reduce the deficit and close tax loopholes that benefit the rich. and it will invest in the things that help our economy grow: education, preventive health care, worker training, roads and bridges. it will invest in a strong middle class. and unlike the ryan republican plan, it won't
to meet with house democrats. >> economy is trying to give us signs it wants to launch. the president wants to be there to make sure that the 535 elected members in congress. and the individual american people elected to be president of the united states are ready to launch with the economy. >> also today, treasury secretary jack lew talked about the possibility of finding bipartisan compromise. >> i think there is a growing sense that everyone knows where the balance fair deal is. everyone knows we need to get there. they just don't know how to get there. you have to start. >> today, as far as discussions about reinstating some of the white house tours ts in, in the briefing jay carney says there has been discussions about trying to get specific groups in. no decision on that point and no plans to reverse the overall decision to suspend tours for now. >> bret: shannon bream live on the white house lawn. thank you. the dow's run is now in double digits. the industrial average made it ten straight winning days to gain 84 today. closing at another record high. s&p 500 was up 9. the nasd
jack lew weighs in on the markets and the american economy. his interview just ahead. >>> and the tsa under fire. the growing backlash over knives on planes. what every traveler needs to know. good evening, everyone, and welcome to our public television viewers. suzy, the market beat goes on and on. >> it's like the energizer bunny. it just keeps going and going. the dow marches on higher for the tenth day in a row, the first time since 1997 -- 1996. it ended at 14,539. the nasdaq added 14 and the broader s&p 500 gained almost 9 points, and it's now just 2 points away from its own record high close. >>> there is some concern that the rise in the markets may have been too high too fast. and this could be the start of a market bubble. butewly installed treasury secretary jack lew tells steve liesman not so. >> the analysis i've seen doesn't give me reason to be worried right now. >> we'll have more of steve's interview with the treasury secretary in just a few minutes. >>> as the dow hits unprecedenteded heights and the s&p 500 nears its own peak tantalizingly close to it, there's a bat
, growing the economy, strengthening the middle class and reducing the deficit. our proposal puts people to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fisca
-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has raised the cost of the premiums for average family, and in the neighborhood of $5,000. this is a disaster. and the real
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
in a way@ that does not expose the economy to rest in does not require a taxpayer bailout. i think that the tools are in place to do that. again, it is a matter of using those tools. there are couple of things that the regulators need to do. they need to have these banks to restructure themselves to make them simpler so that they are easier to break up. as a work in progress. they also need to force them to issue more long-term unsecured debt that would be available for lots -- loss absorption of four of them fails. the starter capitol requirements but we also need minimums for long-term debt as well. and that would make them more resolvable and also, level the playing field between the cost and the smaller institutions. melissa: people walk around now and say to big to fail is alive and well. nothing has really changed. to you agree? >> i think we are making progress. the rating agencies have downgraded some what the mega banks. they still get cheap funding when the go to the market. much cheaper than the smaller banks. we have made progress. my former agency has come forth with s
was a pretty basic statement. i said, when we think about the health of the u.s. economy, we have to remember that a private sector job in a public-sector job -- and a public-sector job are not the same thing. it private sector job pays for itself. a public-sector job is paid for by taxpayers. i thought it was a pretty obvious statement. later, my staff was contacted by a reporter who felt that he needed to fact check the statement. seriously. it was interesting to me, because it said how little so many people understand what makes the economy go. one of our fundamental issues in this country is we have a lot of people setting policy that impacts our economy, but they don't understand how the economy actually works. and the impact of that policy. my second anecdote is this, in a of smallll, 70% business owners said that they thought the federal government was hostile to them. not neutral. not negative. hostile. remember that figure, remember that statement. here we have the stock market achieving record highs day after day. we have large companies in many, many industries reporting record pro
the negativity out there i believe optimism is in the air. the stock market record highs, the economy is picking up, president obama in a charm offensive because his polls are way down. in fact he's now talking corporate tax reform. even pushing democrats on entitlement reform or so he says. now i know, i know, my favorite president reagan trust by verify, but i think there's some optimism out there and i'm going to do my best now to persuade my pal, conservative superstar ann coulter. she's the author on set for the full hour. jimmy williams. and michelle caruso-cabrera. ann coulter, i know you think i'm nuts but i'm telling you the stock market is a great signal. the republicans won on the sequester. obama's poll are down so now he's having to come to the negotiation table. i like this story. i want to be optimistic about this story. >> um, i want to be optimistic too. but i want to be realist jig. all,000 are the financial maven and i would normally defer to you, that's the only thing i'm pessimistic about. i think the economy -- i would not count on the stock market continuing to go up. i kn
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
jobs and improve the economy in every one of our districts, in every state in the union. i would turn, if i could, to my colleague, mr. polcan, who has some of the rations. >> i am glad you brought this amendment forward, mr. blumenauer. when i was on the joint committee on finance, we were the only committee in the country that had to approve every single dollar that came through from the recovery dollars. in our state, every single dollar came to our committee. i got to see exactly where those investment dollars went to our transportation projects. we had a report at the time from the road building and vertical construction industry, not your most left-wing organization, that said 54,000 jobs were saved or created in wisconsin because of that investment in infrastructure. i remember sitting in this very room and i asked dr. elmendorf that same question. i said is it true, and he set up to 3.3 million jobs were saved or created because of those recovery dollars. i can tell you in wisconsin, we saw the benefit. it came from the private sector. we saw the benefit for small businesses -
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
revenue. you will get less tax renue when the economy is smaller. this is something that the market understands. they want to see the economy grow. less in the future is better for the economy and markets. neil: that would mean no that if we are continuing on this trend, everything that the markets are celebrating right now, slobby sequestration, whenever you want to call it could be short-lived and there could be problems. what do you see happening? >> well, i think rand paul messages effective not only for the markets, but for the economy and the country at large because he is making a connection between economic liberty and prosperity. he understands that does look to the 20th-ctury. always the most prosperous countries are always the most free. and the message of essentially constitutionality, individual rights, that is tremendously bullish for the market. bullish for the economy. hitting t nail on the head. the fact that everything investors are seeing that we had a sequestered. this guy did not fall. there is still more work to be done in terms of cutting the size of governmen
this economy. and i thank you once again, my good friend from california, for making all the important points this evening. mr. garamendi: washington, d.c., your leadership in this community has been known for some time and i thank you very much for joining us tonight. i want to do two things before i end. first of all, medicare is back on the table. the ryan budget takes up medicare once again and provides a voucher that will destroy it. i'm going to change this. medicare, 1965, president 2013, created by l.b.j., destroyed by the g.o.p. i don't think so. seniors don't want it. americans don't want it. the last campaign for presidency, this was one of the major issues and ryan is coming back with it. bad idea, bad timing. and i want to end with this, this is a great country. there is no other place in the world like the united states. it is one terrific country. there is enormous energy in this country, where people want to get a job and go to work and businesses want to grow and hire people. all of that is waiting for congress to get its act together, to get this sequestration out of the way
. because obama didn't learn the lesson from reagan that if you want to turn the economy around, you cut taxes, you reduce spending, you reduce the debt and don't send regulators like locusts to destroy small businesses and jobs. [ applause ] do you know if president obama had followed the reagan policies and we had seen the identical growth that president reagan saw inheriting the same lousy economy barak obama did, do you know that today we would have 7 million additional new jobs in america? let me help make that a little more concrete. 7 million new jobs is the equivalent of giving a job to every man, woman and child in chicago, houston, philadelphia, and boston. that's what we're talking about. [ applause ] and the stagnation under president obama doesn't fall uniformly. listen, if you so happen to be a tax lawyer or an environmental lawyer, you're doing great right now. but i'll tell you the people who are hurting the most are those who are struggling in the least well off amongst us. under president obama, hispanic unemployment climbed to 10%. african-american unemployment to 14%.
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
-- to turn the corner on deficit reduction and support rowing the economy. of that -- support growing the economy. of that, we have already committed to 2.4 trillions -- to $2.4 trillion. , we have to find in some way $1.6 trillion less interest essentially. one way is the sequester. $1.2 trillion in sequester. that is one way. the chairwoman's budget does it a different way. we are sank him instead of using the sequester to get the $1.2 trillion because it does not reflect common sense, it's just arbitrary and across the board during instead of use -- across- the-board. instead of using the sequester, we use this budget which meets the $1.6 trillion with interest durin. in total, it's $1.85 trillion. is that correct? >> yes. if you look at where our target is to get to all the bipartisan andps and where sensible -- were simpson-bowles wanted us to is a path to get to 4.3 c and dollars -- $4.3 trillion to get to thesis mark. x one ways to do sequester. one ways to do it the way we are doing it, which is come instead of arbitrary across-the- board cuts, doing it in what we would view a
start controlling spending, but also focus on getting the economy back in track. i mentioned to the president if you want to start today and creating jobs, energy is a really good place to start. pen the stroke of the president could create 25,000 jobs. and look at the outer continental shelf, there are a lot of opportunities to create tens of thousands of good, high- paying jobs in the energy industry were not only do you , but youally good jobs also bring in treasury revenue that will reduce the deficit. you allow the country to become energy independent so we do not have to buy so many -- so much oil from the eastern countries that do not like us. we will see in the next few weeks if the president is serious about working with us. >> where did the president say i agree with you, let's do that? >> i specifically mentioned to the president on spending. he came as we said he will close the white house to tours. i said instead of these kinds of things of closing of the white house and threatening to lay off food inspectors, how about working with us on real specific ways that
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